Extreme History Online Book Club

Online Book Club 2022
Theme: Women in the West

All book club meetings will meet via Zoom at 6pm on the designated date, see below. For questions email us at info@extremehistoryproject.org. Click here to register on Zoom for one or all of the book club meetings. Click here to register for the Zoom book club meeting.

February 3 – Clara’s Journal: The Story of Two Pandemics, by Vickie Oddino
April 7 – Home Lands: How Women Made the West, by Virginia Scharff and Carolyn Brucken
June 2 – Poet Warrior: A Memoir, by Joy Harjo
August 4 – How Much of these Hills is Gold, by C. Pam Zhang
October 6 – Dreaming with the Ancestors: Black Seminole Women in Texas and Mexico, by Shirley Boteler Mock
December 1 – Helmi’s Shadow: A Journey of Survival from Russia to East Asia to the American West, by David Horgan

Online Book Club 2021
Theme: Indigenous Activism

The Night Watchman, by Louise Erdrich
Sarah Winnemucca, by Sally Zanjani
As Long as Grass Grows: The Indigenous Fight for Environmental Justice, From Colonization to Standing Rock, by Dina Gilio-Whitaker
Viet Cong at Wounded Knee: The Trail of a Blackfeet Activist, by Woody Kipp
Surviving Wounded Knee: The Lakotas and the Politics of Memory, by David W. Grua
All Our Relations, by Winona LaDuke

Online Book Club 2020

Braiding Sweetgrass, by Robin Wall Kimmerer

Bound Like Grass: A Memoir from the High Plains, by Ruth McLaughlin

Waiting for the Revolution, by Jo Anne Troxel

Murder Along the Yellowstone Trail: The Execution of Seth Danner, by Kelly Hartman

The Woman’s Hour, by Elaine Weiss

Bitterroot: A Salish Memoir of Transracial Adoption, by Susan Devan Harness

PAST BOOK CLUB OFFERINGS

Join us right here September 11 – 17 for our next online Book club! We’ll be reading A Guide to Historic Bozeman, by Jim Jenks for our week-long Tea and Revolution Dialogue Series: Building Community Through Historic Preservation. Pick up the book at Amazon here:

Join the Book club online here: https://extremehistoryproject.org/a-guide-to-historic-bozeman/

Book image

Welcome to our online book club! Join us November 3rd through December 4th while we read One Woman, One Vote: Rediscovering the Woman’s Suffrage Movement.

Click on the image below to purchase the book from Amazon.

book image

Below you will find a series of four study guides to help you make the most of your reading. They contain guiding questions to help you reflect and remember the material from the book. The study guides can be downloaded by clicking on the save icon at the top right of each guide. You can also just read the pages here on the website by using the scroll bar on the right of each guide.

Below each guide are links to further reading about specific aspects of the chapters. Here you can learn more about the specific topics that interest you. There are also links to photo files where you can see images of the people, events and media that came together to make this important historical event happen.

Below the links and study guides are questions for discussion which will allow you to reflect on your thoughts and ideas. Feel free to respond to the questions posed, or add your own question or comment.

Encourage your friends and relatives to join in on the reading and discussions. This is a great opportunity to share this important history with those you nurture and guide. We must all remember the sacrifices our mothers and grandmothers made in order that we have the rights that we do. Lets insure the next generation will continue the good work!

Finally, be sure and attend our screening of the PBS Experience Film One Woman, One Vote, followed by a panel discussion of the history, present and future of the women’s movement! December 4th, 6pm, Hager Auditorium, the Museum of the Rockies.

Special thanks to Natalie Scheidler, Sydney Hoffner and Jenica Rodriquez for their help in preparing these study guides! 

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Links to further study for Chapters 1 – 4

Abigail Adams: The Seed for Women’s Rights

Not for Ourselves Alone. The Story of Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton

Frederick Douglas’ speech at the Seneca Falls Convention

14th Amendment to the Constitution

15th Amendment to the Constitution

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Links to further study for Chapters 5 – 9

Legal Contender: Victoria Woodhall first woman to run for President

Bradwell v. Illinois: Chief Justice Chase’s Dissent and the “Sphere of Women’s Work”

Virginia Minor and Women’s Right to Vote

The Trial of Susan B. Anthony

Right Choice, Wrong Reasons: Wyoming Women Win the Right to Vote

An Experiment in Progressive Legislation: The Granting of Women Suffrage in Utah in 1870.

Abigail Scott Duniway and Idaho Suffrage

Francis Willard

Mary Church Terrell Speech: What it Means to be Colored in the Capital of the US

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Links to further study for Chapters 10 -14

The Women’s Bible

School Suffrage and the Campaign for Women’s Suffrage in Massachusetts, 1879-1920

Susan B. Anthony: Celebrating “a heroic life”

Jane Addams Biography

Honoring Unsung Hero of Woman’s Rights Movement: Jane Addams advanced suffrage, democracy and world peace

Anti suffrage Essays by Massachusetts Women

The Use of Rhetoric in Anti Suffrage and Anti Feminist Publications

Harriot Stanton Blatch Biography

Mobilizing Woman-Power by Harriot Stanton Blatch

Women Socialists and Women’s Suffrage Montana News, May 14, 1908

Ida B. Wells Barnett Biography

Ida B. Wells Barnett and her Passion for Justice

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Watch the full HBO film Iron Jawed Angels here:

Texas Originals: Minnie Fisher Cunningham

Petition from Minnie Fisher Cunningham
https://www.flickr.com/photos/usnationalarchives/6554338715/player/

Links to further study for Chapters 15 – 19

Carrie Chapman Catt Biography

Carrie Chapman Catt Speech “The Crisis” delivered September 7, 1916, Atlanta Ga.

Texas Originals: Minnie Fisher Cunningham”

War of the Roses: Women’s Suffrage in Tennesee

Join our Discussion! Read through the questions in the comments section below and respond using the “reply” button below each question. Have a comment or question you’d like to post? Add it to the bottom using the comment “reply” box. Thanks for participating!

Comments
  1. What surprised you most about this book?

  2. Why is this information important?

  3. What do you want to know more about?

  4. Has this book changed any previously held opinions?

  5. What will you teach the next generation about this issue?

  6. Which essay or essays stood out for you and why?

  7. What women’s issues are we still dealing with today?

  8. How has your role in life shaped your feminist consciousness?

  9. What “traditional” beliefs about the role of women are still influencing policy today?

  10. How have social constructions of identity influenced contemporary equal rights movements?

  11. What role should the government in maintaining and supporting human rights?

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